All posts filed under “mobile hci

MobileHCI 2016 – My Highlights

MobileHCI is a conference near and dear to my heart and one  I’ve been involved in for almost 10 years. I’ve been publishing and attending the conference yearly since 2007. I’ve also helped organize different tracks over the years — I gave an invited tutorial in 2012 in San Francisco and co-organized the interactive tutorials track in 2014 in Toronto. This year’s conference took place in beautiful Florence, Italy. And I was one of the conference program chairs alongside Prof Antonio Kruger from the German Research Center for AI (DFKI); Prof Jonna Hakkila from the Industrial Design at Faculty of Art and Design, University of Lapland; and Dr Marcos Serrano, from University of Toulouse.

Cheesy smiley photo overlooking the Ponte Vecchio taken by the lovely @aquigley

Cheesy smiley photo overlooking the Ponte Vecchio taken by the lovely @aquigley

I also took part in an invited panel on the Future of Mobile Interaction, Computing and Life. My fellow panelists included Daniel Ashbrook, Associate Professor in Rochester Institute of Technology; Anind Dey, Director of the HCI Institute in Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Kori Inkpen, Principal Research at Microsoft; Lucia Terrenghi, UX Researcher and Designer at Google; and Kaisa Väänänen, Professor in the Human-Centered Technology Group at Tampere University of Technology. It was an amazing conference and while there is just too much to mention, what follow’s are just a few highlights from this year’s conference.

#1 All about Emoji!

There were 3 emoji related research papers which shed light on how and why people use emoji in their communications. Super interesting and fun! We’re looking into exploring similar patterns of emoji usage in business communication at Intercom so watch this space!

#2 The Future of Communication

Adrian's keynote on Everysense Everywhere Human Communication

Adrian’s keynote on Everysense Everywhere Human Communication

Adrian David Cheok gave a super opening keynote entitled Everysense Everywhere Human Communication. He talked about new types of communication environments which use all the senses, including touch, taste, and smell, to increase support for multi-person multi-modal interaction and remote presence.  Some of his quirky demo’s included:

  • A device that attaches to your mobile phone and enables you to feel (and give) a kiss remotely
  • A device that attaches to your mobile phone and emits a smell/scent instead of audio sounds to act as an alternative alarm clock. He demoed an actual use case — Oscar mayer, the bacon company in the US, have an alarm called called “wake up and smell the bacon”!! 
  • A device that enables taste signals to be transmitted virtually. This prototype “digital taste machine” was featured on BBC One’s Tomorrow’s Food and enables people to taste certain things like sweetness, sourness, etc.

While much of what Adrian presented is pretty out there, it opens up a bunch of questions about the future of personal and digital communication :)

#3 Handling Notifications

Demos, demos, demos!! Photo courtesy of @aquigley

Demos, demos, demos!! Photo courtesy of @aquigley

Notification management was a key theme in many talks. That is, understanding if/how the growing number of mobile notifications impact on people, how people attend to notifications, the cost of interrupting the user and methods for helping them manage inbound notifications they receive on their mobile phones and smartwatches. Research included:

In fact there was an entire workshop dedicated to the topic of notifications and attention management.


2016 Conference Org – Mobile HCI & RecSys

2016 looks set to be a busy year for conference organization with 2 super exciting announcements to make.

(1) I’m serving as paper co-chair for ACM Mobile HCI, a conference very near and dear to my heart. My fellow papers chairs are Jonna Hakkila from University of Lapland (Finland), Antonio Kruger from DFKI (Germany) and Marcos Serrano from University of Toulouse (France). Please check out the Mobile HCI 2016 website and get thinking about your paper submissions! Deadlines for paper submissions are 12th February 2016.

(2) I’m also serving as industry track co-chair for ACM RecSys 2016 alongside. My fellow chairs are Paul Lamere from Spotify and Hrishi Aradhye from Google. Our aim is to devise a super interesting industry line up so if (a) you work in industry and (b) your work involves “recommending things to people” why not consider submitting a proposal to the track?

Honorable Mention Award @ MobileHCI 2015: The Challenges of Mobile Phone Usage Data

A collaborative paper with Denzil Ferreira of University of Oulu, Nikola Banovic of Carnegie Mellon University and Kent Lyons a past colleague from Yahoo, in which we explore the challenges of mobile phone usage data through an analysis of three diverse smartphone application usage datasets, has been given an honorable mention award for the upcoming Mobile HCI 2015 conference in Denmark.

The goal of this work was to broaden our understanding of smartphone usage by investigating if differences in mobile device usage occurred not only across our three datasets, but also in relation to prior work. We provide an extensive review of prior work on related mobile data sets and mobile studies, present details of our comparative analysis focusing on top apps and micro-usage behaviors but most importantly we discuss the challenges and issues of conducting mobile research of this nature and reflect on caveats related to the replicability and generalizability of such work.

We’re delighted with the award / nomination!

Denzil worked on a beautiful visual table in our review of related work (see below). And you can read a pre-print of the paper here.

literature-final

Frappé: Paper on arXiv & Context-Aware App Usage Dataset Release

During my last few months in Telefonica Research in 2013 I worked with wonderful colleagues and RecSys gurus Linas Baltrunas and Alexandros Karatzoglou along with scientific director Nuria Oliver on a context-aware mobile app recommendation service called Frappé. Frappé was specifically designed to support novel app discovery experiences. In order to assess it’s effectiveness we deployed Frappé in-the-wild on Google Play and ran a smaller-scale user study with 33 users designed to evaluate user perceptions of using and engaging with an app recommendation service.

Yes, it’s been a while since working on this specific project, however, I have 2 very exciting announcements to share about Frappé.

  • Firstly, a paper describing the Frappé application, our large-scale Google Play deployment and insights from our smaller scale user study has been published on arXiv. In particular we describe actionable lessons learned related to designing, deploying and evaluating mobile context-aware recommender systems in-the-wild with real users. Details and PDF are available here.
  • Secondly, we have released the anonymized Frappé data set!! It can be downloaded from Linas’s website HERE. The dataset contains 96,202 records by 957 users for 4,082 apps. We’re very excited to see what the RecSys and Mobile HCI communities end up doing with this rich dataset, in particular in terms of pushing the envelop in the context-aware recommender systems domain.

If you end up using the data, we ask that you please cite the following paper:

@Article{frappe15,
title={Frappe: Understanding the Usage and Perception of Mobile App Recommendations In-The-Wild},
author = {Linas Baltrunas, Karen Church, Alexandros Karatzoglou, Nuria Oliver},
date={2015},
urldate={2015-05-12},
eprinttype={arxiv},
eprint={arXiv:1505.03014}
}

Happy researching folks!!!

Presentation @ CHI2015: Understanding mobile search & app interactions

Last week JP Carrascal presented our study on the interactions between mobile search and mobile apps at CHI 2015 in Seoul, Korea. JP did a fantastic job presenting and handled the flurry of questions afterwards very well! In fact JP gave two talks in the same “Understanding Everyday Use of Mobile Phones” session chaired by Matt Jones!

The idea behind this work is to understand more about the behaviors and motivations around smartphone users transitioning between mobile search engines and mobile apps (and vice versa) when trying to find information to satisfy their daily information needs. We were also interested in exploring the various triggers and actions associated with mobile search. To shed some light on these mobile search and app interactions we designed and conducted a 2-week, mixed-method study involving 18 Android users in the Bay Area. The deck explains the core motivations, approach alongside key results. Questions or comments feel free to contact JP or I. And if interested in reading the full CHI 2015 paper it’s available here.


Mobile HCI 2015 Workshop on Attention Management on Mobile Devices Accepted!


I’m delighted to announce that we have recently had our workshop proposal accepted to Mobile HCI 2015. The workshop entitled Smarttention, Please! Intelligent Attention Management on Mobile Devices is being organized with Benjamin Poppinga, Nuria Oliver, Martin Pielot, Niels Henze and Alireza Sahami. Given the rise of smart devices and the increasing reliance and volume of mobile notifications people have to deal with on a daily basis, we thought a workshop on the topic of attention management would be timely! And what better venue that Mobile HCI 2015.

We welcome submissions which aim to understand users and attention-related aspects, e.g., when do users attend notifications, how do users set their ringer mode switch, or the costs of interruptions. Topics of interest include: Read More